What’s the hardest thing about being a flight attendant?

What’s the hardest thing about being a flight attendant?

While the hardest part of the job isn’t always on board, things can get stressful mid-flight. “We have to be ready for anything: a fire, an angry passenger or a medical event. And medical events happen more than you think,” Sarah Motter, another crew member, told me.

How long does the flight attendant training last?

10 weeks
The flight attendant training course lasts 10 weeks. Most students have already started interviewing with airlines by the time they graduate, and some even have job offers. Each person’s experience will be different, so keep that in mind.

Can you fail flight attendant training?

What happens if I fail the training program? During the training program you may be able to retake a test – although this depends on the airline, and will likely depend on the need for flight attendants versus the number of applicants as to whether or not this will be offered.

Are flight attendant jobs hard to get?

“It’s very competitive and people get overlooked all the time,” Long says of becoming a flight attendant. Long says many flight attendants apply and go through several interviews before getting the job, having to wait six months to a year between interviews because job offers are so scarce.

What are the 3 main characteristics of a flight attendant?

Flight attendants must also possess the following specific qualities:

  • Attention. Flight attendants must be aware of passenger needs to ensure a pleasant travel experience.
  • Communication skills.
  • Customer service skills.
  • Decision making skills.
  • Physical endurance.

Do you have to be pretty to be an air hostess?

You may have heard that flight attendants back in the day had to fit into a certain physical mold, and it’s true. These days, you don’t have to be a lean, slender model to land the gig, but you do need to look presentable. For Delta and United, this means that no tattoos are visible in uniform.

What qualifications do I need to be a flight attendant?

You must be over 18 to become a cabin crew member. Ability to speak a second language is highly desirable. Airlines generally require a good standard of education, including GCSEs (AC grades) in maths and English, or equivalent qualifications.

How old can a flight attendant be?

The minimum age required to be a flight attendant is 18 years old. Some airlines require you to be 19 or 20 when you apply, but none are allowed to require you to be over 21. Another common question we get is if you can become a flight attendant later in life.

How intensive is the training of flight attendants?

Flight attendant training is one of the most emotional, intense, stressful, exhausting and thrilling experiences you are likely to have in your life. But once you earn your wings, it’s worth it in the end. It takes a lot of commitment, dedication and pride in your work to be successful.

How are flight attendants trained to handle difficult passengers?

As part of flight attendant training, cabin crew members are trained to deal with difficult customer situations. The basic principle is to diffuse the situation while disturbing the other passengers as little as possible. Here are Keinonen’s five tips for dealing with difficult customers on board:

Can a flight attendant refuse to serve a drink to a passenger?

If one of the flight attendants has refused to serve a drink to a passenger, the others should not do so either. While the air crew always support each other in difficult situations, often other passengers have also been helpful, although we are trained to handle them without outside help.

Why are there so many difficult situations on flights?

Keinonen says the typically difficult situations on vacation flights involve a passenger who has had too much to drink. “In my experience, 90% of difficult situations on board are related to alcohol consumption,” she says. “I understand that people want to let loose and have fun while on vacation.

How do cabin crew handle difficult passengers?

While the air crew always support each other in difficult situations, often other passengers have also been helpful, although we are trained to handle them without outside help. “If the situation is extreme, the cabin crew can threaten the passenger with a stopover.